The UEC TESOL Institute donates half a ton of rice to the flood victims in Ayutthaya, Thailand, one of the areas worst hit by the floods. The rice will be put into 5 kg bags before being distributed by the Royal Thai Armed Forces.

Experiencing the worst flooding in the last fifty years, villagers are trying to survive while depending completely on donations, and the country is struggling to find ways to aid the rising number of people directly impacted by the deluge.

Thailand Flood 2011

Flooding in Thailand

Flooding in Thailand


Severe flooding occurred during the 2011 monsoon season in Thailand. Beginning at the end of July triggered by the landfall of Tropical Storm Nock-ten, flooding soon spread through the provinces of Northern, Northeastern and Central Thailand along the Mekong and Chao Phraya river basins. In October floodwaters reached the mouth of the Chao Phraya and inundated parts of the capital city of Bangkok.

Flooding persisted in some areas until mid-January 2012, and resulted in a total of 815 deaths (with 3 missing) and 13.6 million people affected. Sixty-five of Thailand’s 77 provinces were declared flood disaster zones, and over 20,000 square kilometres of farmland was damaged.

The disaster has been described as “the worst flooding yet in terms of the amount of water and people affected.”

The World Bank has estimated 1,425 billion baht in economic damages and losses due to flooding, as of 1 December 2011. Most of this was to the manufacturing industry, as seven major industrial estates were inundated by as much 3 meters (10 feet) during the floods. Disruptions to manufacturing supply chains affected regional automobile production and caused a global shortage of hard disk drives, which is expected to last throughout 2012.

The World Bank’s estimate for this disaster means it ranks as the world’s fourth costliest disaster as of 2011 surpassed only by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, 1995 Kobe earthquake, and Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Flooding in Thailand

Flooding in Bangkok

Flooding in Bangkok


Various regions of Thailand are prone to seasonal flash-flooding due to their tropical savanna climate. The floods often occur in the North and spread down the Chao Phraya River through the central plains, in the Northeast along the Chi and Mun Rivers flowing into the Mekong, or in the coastal hillsides of the East and South.

Remnants of tropical storms that strike Vietnam or the peninsular south commonly increase precipitation, resulting in further risk of flooding. Drainage control systems, including multiple dams, irrigation canals and flood detention basins,have been implemented, but are inadequate to prevent flood damage, especially to rural areas.

A lot of effort, including a system of drainage tunnels begun in 2001 has been put into preventing the enormous flooding of the capital city, which lies near the mouth of the Chao Phraya and is prone to flooding, with considerable success, Bangkok having seen only brief and minor flooding since the major flood of 1995. Other regions, however, have experienced severe flooding as recently as 2010.

Thailand Survives Flood

Thailand Survives Flood

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